Figuring out this work flow thing… eventually.

Picture of newspaper with crossword puzzle and glasses and pen lying on top
I need to discern patterns to live effectively. Sometimes it feels like it takes forever to figure it out.

Ha! I’ve finally figured a few things out. I’m a “late bloomer” in many ways, developing skills at a different rate than other non-autistic people — social skills, logistics skills, and just figuring things out at a different rate than other people seem to expect.

The crux of it all is that I’m a heavy-duty pattern-thinker, and it takes me a while to identify patterns — including exceptions to rules. It takes me years of observation, sometimes, before I get to a place where I’m feeling expert enough to predict what’s going to happen… where my anxiety is at a manageable level… and I can just relax and settle into my life.

I’m currently at this place, in terms of my day-to-day responsibilities. I’ve got a full roster of activities at work, and I’ve finally figured out that I don’t have to attend every single meeting on my calendar. Yeah, I know — you’d think that I’d get that, by now, but I can be extremely literal and rigid when it comes to my obligations. And frankly, my determination to keep every single commitment I make has worked in my favor many times, over the years.

But as I look at my calendar today, after 2 days off work and hundreds of emails to catch up on, I realize that some of that stuff is optional.

Plus — major development — I realize now that I don’t need to be fully engaged in every single meeting I attend. Many meetings I attend cover a variety of topics, and I don’t have anything to say about some of those topics. Or they have nothing to do with me. Or they’re informational only. So, I can actually be doing other things at those moments. Like catch up on emails. Like browse through Twitter. Like do a little web searching for subjects that fascinate me. Walk around. Get something to eat or drink. I’ve perfected my technique for calling in to conference calls with my mobile phone, while doing conferencing on my laptop.

Balance is good.

So is realizing that I don’t have to be 100% ON, 100% of the time.

That’s just exhausting, and I’m tired of being so exhausted every single waking moment.

Of course, this all takes time to work out. And sometimes I get so wiped out by the situation that I can’t continue long enough to really figure it out. I have to change jobs, because I’m in danger of failing so catastrophically that my “career” (as it were) could be derailed and I’d never be able to hold my head up in the field where I work. Those times are the worst — a horrible in-between place where I’ve gotten far enough down a path to partly understand my situation, but I’m not far enough to  really get it. And being so depleted and disoriented, that I’m incoherent in job interviews.

Ugh. So horrible.

But every now and then, like now, I get to a point where things “click” into place, and I actually have the sense that I understand my situation and I “have a feel” for it. And parts of the whole become second-nature to me.

Like right now… as I blog while half-listening to a conference call that doesn’t have 100% to do with me and my work.

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One thought on “Figuring out this work flow thing… eventually.

  1. Glad you figured it out! I came to that realization quite a few years ago and it’s the only way I’ve managed with all the calls my organization seems to love to have. And especially the past decade, they want me on so many of them if I actually devoted my attention to them all, I would never get any work done. 🙂 I pay a bit of attention with some part of my brain that often catches things I actually need to hear.

    Liked by 1 person

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