PFL demographics – here’s how the use of person-first language stacks up between age groups

PFL Usage Comparison - Children vs. Adolescents vs. Adults - 10 years
PFL Usage Comparison – Children vs. Adolescents vs. Adults – 10 years

As you can see, person-first language about children really outstrips the identity-first language for adolescents and adults.

PFL Usage Comparison - Children vs. Adolescents vs. Adults - Percentages
PFL Usage Comparison – Children vs. Adolescents vs. Adults – Percentages

The percentages seem pretty similar to the identity-first language, with a corresponding increase in the volume and overall percentage representation of adults being researched.

I think that’s a good thing for the adults?

Maybe?

What puzzles me, is the dearth of research about adolescents. I might just be using the wrong terms. Maybe I should be searching for info on boys and girls. That seems reasonable.

And if I do that, then I need to search for explicit info on men and women.

Oh, this just gets more involved, as time goes on.  Seems I’ve opened up a sort of Pandora’s box, here…

But in a fun way 🙂

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3 thoughts on “PFL demographics – here’s how the use of person-first language stacks up between age groups

  1. I’m taking two things away from this (after reading all your statistics posts): one, PFL outstrips IFL any way you look at it – makes you wonder what goes on in their heads when they say “autistic” that they are so reluctant to use it – and two, that despite an increase of research into adults and adolescents, the vast majority of the research is still about children. Did I get this right?
    I love a good number crunch, thank you for putting this together!

    Like

    1. VisualVox

      I agree — PFL clearly “wins”. I think it has to do with the official practice being PFL (the American Psychological Association strongly recommends it, and since 1988, PFL has been the legislative preference in the USA).

      Also, since these are all scientific results (with citations – which kind of skews things a bit, now that I think about it), there may be a tendency to “chunk out” different data points — which topic has to do with the condition/disorder, which has to do with the person. I don’t think it’s malicious.

      For the children piece of it, there’s a clear dominance, based on the terms I chose. But that could be because I’ve chosen “adolescents” over “girls” and “boys”. I’m starting to think that — because of the strong tendency to “genderize” or “sexualize” adolescents, there’s going to be a lot more research explicitly about boys and girls, so I need to pull those numbers, too.

      It’s all very fascinating… Thanks for your thoughts.

      Like

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