Sharing: Why An Autism Diagnosis Can Be A Necessity

child standing watching sunset over a body of waterThe points in this piece can be as true of adults, as they are of children. It can help immensely to understand the nature of your issues — as well as accept them as how you just are.

If you had told me four months ago that I would be writing today about how my daughter has autism, I would have said that couldn’t be true. I didn’t see it four months ago.
I still didn’t see it when her developmental pediatrician pointed out the signs as he wrote in his book and watched her play. When he ended his interview with how he felt certain that my daughter was on the spectrum, I felt myself become numb and suddenly all the sound went from the room and I could hear my heart beating in my ears.

Then I found myself becoming quietly angry with him while he casually pointed out how she wasn’t making eye contact with us. How she kept crashing cars and knocking over block towers, but couldn’t replicate a simple block tower herself. How she knew all of her shapes, colors and every picture on every flash card, but couldn’t respond appropriately to simple directions. How she repeated phrases over and over again in order to communicate, but couldn’t answer a yes or no question with “yes.” She couldn’t hold a back and forth conversation. She never asked questions. She never used pronouns. She flaps her hands and walks and runs haphazardly.

What bothered me the most about this diagnosis was not the 15 hours a week of early intervention therapy, having to fill out the mountains of paperwork in order to enroll her and begin her IEP for school, meeting with liaison and case workers, or even that we didn’t know what the future might hold for her. It was that suddenly, the very things I loved about my daughter — all the things that I felt made her unique and beautiful — were now symptoms of a disorder.

Read the rest at: Why An Autism Diagnosis Can Be A Necessity

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