RAADS-R Retest – where am I on the Autistic Spectrum today?

RAADS-R-resultsThe RAADS-R is the The Ritvo Autism Asperger Diagnostic Scale-Revised (RAADS-R), which as I understand it, is one of the more clinically recognized tests for folks on the Autistic Spectrum.

I’m one of those people who likes taking these kinds of tests, because it gives me quantitative data — however limited it may be — to orient myself in the world. One thing I really like about the RAADS-R is that it factors in how things were when you were young, how things are now, and if there’s been consistency between your early years and your present (assumedly adult) life.

The one place where it falls down for me, is that it doesn’t measure the intensity or impact of the issues it tracks. That would be very useful for me to have, and it’s one thing I’m incorporating into the ASC (Autism Spectrum Condition – I like saying that better than “disorder”) profile builder that I’m working on.

I’ve got the first part of the three-part survey done, in terms of content selection. And I’ll be building out the first spreadsheet for it. And yes, I’ll be accounting for things in childhood, youth, adulthood, and later years. AND I’ll be accounting for intensity and impact – more on that later.

Anyway, I’m taking the RAADS-R test again, just to warm up for the day. Because it’s fun for me. And I also want to see how autistic I’m feeling today. It comes and goes, and it changes. And that’s another issue around ASC testing — we have our own internal spectrums, and as it’s pointed out in the Inclusive autistic traits list at autisticality, there’s variation to our experience and presentation. Like so:

Variation

  1. Variation of traits.
    • A. Long-term variation.
      • May change throughout development from childhood to adulthood.
      • May change over years during adulthood.
    • B. Environment.
      • May be more sensitive to overload when already stressed, ill, or tired.
      • May use different social behaviour depending on social situation.
  2. Variation of presentation.
    • A. Conscious variation.
      • May deliberately mask traits in certain situations.
      • May use learned rules to replace instincts.
    • B. Unconscious variation.
      • May have learned masking behaviour from early childhood.
      • May have trauma or mental illness which affects presentation of traits.

See the whole list here – it’s a good one!

Anyway, I just took the test again, and I’m a bit more autistic today, than I was about a month ago.

Image description: Screenshot of my RAADS-R results showing Language, Social relatedness, Sensory/motor, and Circumscribed interests for both May and June. My scores are slightly higher for today. Overall, I am above the autistic spectrum threshold
Image description: Screenshot of my RAADS-R results showing Language, Social relatedness, Sensory/motor, and Circumscribed interests for both May and June. My scores are slightly higher for today. Overall, I am above the autistic spectrum threshold

So, there it is… my Sunday morning foray into RAADS-R.

Taking the test again, I can think of a number of ways I’d rephrase the questions, or ways I’d qualify them. But it doesn’t offer that much granularity.

In any case, I think it’s a useful exercise, helping me better understand myself, my issues, and reminding me — yet again — that there are certain things I need to actively manage and also factor into my daily life.

So, that’s useful.

 

 

2 thoughts on “RAADS-R Retest – where am I on the Autistic Spectrum today?

  1. This field was intentionally left blank

    OMG cool!! My score today was 196, too 🙂 lol ❤

    I giggled when I read that you’d rephrase some of the questions, because there are a few that I would, too. For example, some of the things they said made one anxious, I feel more as irritability (which could stem from anxiety, I’ve realized). 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: ‘More autistic’ after Asperger’s / autism diagnosis / discovery? – the silent wave

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